Our Spaces


An Elegant, Multi-Use Venue
This versatile rental space has hosted numerous concerts, film and photo shoots, dance & theater performances, fashion shows, art exhibits, celebrity boxing matches, conferences, corporate events, product launches, film screenings, wedding ceremonies & receptions, bar/bat mitzvahs, shivas, and birthdays.

The markers of New York’s Gilded Age complement this modern event space under Cathedral-height ceilings, with its Broadway-level 200-light rigging, full concert audio system, and modern HD projector with 22-foot by 22-foot screen.

For concerts, fashion shows, speaking engagements, and other events, a modular stage is readily available.

For catering, the Ballroom offers a ground-level, 500-square-foot prep area with a large sink, plenty of electrical outlets, and tables.  

For seated dinners, the space can accommodate up to 300 guests, 500 for seated performances, and in cocktail settings, 550.

History and Aesthetic
The Broad Street Ballroom was originally the main hall for the most architecturally ambitious bank in Lower Manhattan in the first half of the 20th century. Thirty-foot tall, bronze-capped mosaic columns, original to the building’s construction, adorn the 5,700-square-foot street level ballroom. The Ballroom is like entering another era (with the exception of the amazing audio-visual setup).

Decorative sculptures embellish the facade, all designed and carved by Leo Friedlander, whose work includes sculptures on Washington Memorial Arch in Valley Forge, PA, sculptures on Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington D.C., and several sculptures held in collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Wrapping around the perimeter stands an 85-year-old, 225-foot, painstakingly restored mural, “A Pageantry of the History of Commerce By Sea,” painted by Griffith Baily Coale. The mural covers 3,800 square feet and presents a timeline of 36 generations of sailing vessels, starting with galleys and longships, caravels and clippers, and ending with 1929’s most modern ocean liners framed by the Downtown Manhattan skyline.

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